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Evaluation Toolkit


Welcome to the NEA-Alaska Evaluation Toolkit. Many of our state’s teachers are using the Danielson Framework to improve their teaching, reflect on their practice, and be evaluated. Here you can find actual resources used by real Alaska teachers that are considered to meet the ‘Distinguished’ level of teaching. The examples are grouped by domain with each component having its own description, discussion, and real examples from some of our state’s best teachers. Enjoy!

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Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

1a. Demonstrating knowledge of content and pedagogy

Teachers successfully meeting component 1a are well educated and have extensive knowledge of:

  • Content and structure of the discipline
  • How the content ‘fits in’ with curriculum, previous instruction, and other disciplines
  • How the content informs future learning
  • Content-related pedagogy

1. Extensive Content Knowledge: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers must have a strong command of the subject matter, as well as understand the connections to other disciplines. Effective teachers will frame instruction in terms of intra- and interdisciplinary relationships that bridge the content areas.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Mastery of Instructional Methods: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers employ the most appropriate and effective teaching methods for their content area. Teachers understand how to best raise student achievement from where they are to where they ought to be. Teachers anticipate typical student misconceptions and address them.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Continuing professional development transcripts
  • Documentation of PLC involvement
  • Teaching philosophy
  • Content area PRAXIS scores
  • Additional degrees or certificates
  • List and describe student assignments
  • Video of classroom instruction
  • Lesson plan
  • National Board Certification
Where can you seek out the best professional development opportunities?

How are you keeping current in new developments in your field?

What kind of interdisciplinary activities can you include in your lessons?

What other resources or mentors are available to help me?

What are some student misconceptions you need to ‘head off’?

How do you make sure you take enough time for self-reflection?

What are the most appropriate instructional methods for your content area?

How can your colleagues support your knowledge of content and pedagogy?

1b. Demonstrating knowledge of students

Teachers successfully meeting component 1b incorporate classroom techniques that promote:

  • Knowing the diverse needs of their students
  • Knowing the interests and culture of their students
  • Being aware of student learning styles
  • Knowing prior academic achievements, challenges, and accomplishments of their students
  • Integrating academic monitoring into daily lessons
  • Using knowledge of students to build a sense of trust and community in the classroom

1. Formal and Informal Information: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, the teacher maintains a system of updated formal and informal student records and incorporates medical and/or learning needs into lesson plans.

EX1: Student Perception Survey – (All, 9-12) Bob Williams, Palmer

EX2:

2. Know and Value Cultural Heritage: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, the teacher provides opportunities for students and families to share information about their culture. Teachers integrate their classroom into the community in a way that respects and values cultural heritage.

EX3:

EX4:

3. Know and Integrate Student Interests and Needs: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers adapt lessons and assessments to accommodate students’ interests and needs.

EX5:

EX6:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Record keeping system
  • Surveys, invitations, flyers
  • Pre- and post-reflection from a teacher on cultural experiences
  • Examples of lessons and assessments that demonstrate inclusion of students’ interests
Where can you get data about your students?

How do I integrate knowledge of students into my lessons in a meaningful way?

How do I find out about my community’s events and opportunities?

Do my students feel valued and respected in my classroom and how do I know that?

Do families feel welcomed and informed about my classroom?

How are students and families invited into your classroom?

How are different learning styles supported in your classroom and lessons?

How do you know when students trust the learning environment and their peers?

1c. Setting instructional outcomes

Teachers successfully meeting component 1c incorporate designing instructional outcomes that include:

  • A clear statement of what they want students to learn
  • An appreciation of the material by students
  • Differentiated instruction and assessment
  • Linking of outcomes with those of other disciplines

1. Purposeful Lesson Design: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers clearly identify and communicate desired high-level learning outcomes that meet curriculum requirements. Outcomes are linked to previous and future outcomes within this and other disciplines.

EX1: Level and Standards in Elementary Physical Education – (Physical Education, K-6), Mark Fraad, Seward

EX2:

2. Differentiated Instruction: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, lessons are designed to allow each student access to content at their level. Outcomes are differentiated to encourage individual students to take academic risks and permit viable methods of assessment.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Lesson plans
  • Student exemplars of various desired outcomes
  • Assessments
  • Correlation to standards that highlight diversity
  • Rubrics for assignments that allow student choice
Am I providing student some level of choice?

Have I allowed students to participate in goal setting?

How do I know if I’m meeting the needs of all students?

How do my students demonstrate understanding of the learning outcomes?

What curricular frameworks should I use to ensure accurate sequencing and outcomes?

How do I build in opportunities to encourage students to feel safe taking educational risks?

Are my students challenging themselves as I envisioned they would?

Am I accommodating students with IEP’s?

1d. Demonstrating knowledge of resources

Successfully meeting component 1d the teacher knows:

  • District resources and where to find them
  • Resources available beyond the classroom walls
  • Professional development resources
  • Teacher shares resources with peers

1. Extensive knowledge of resources: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the teacher will talk to colleagues, and utilize district, community, university, internet, and professional organizations. The teacher is persistent even when the resource is difficult to locate.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Teacher Connects the Resources to the Students: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the teacher will facilitate student use of the resources. Teacher maintains a log of available resources for all levels of students and consistently pursues additional information.

EX3:

EX4:

EX5:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Teacher’s resource list
  • District lists of resources
  • Registration for workshops and PD
  • List of community resources
  • Log of resources used for specific units of instructions
  • PLC notes for sharing of resources
  • Pictures of field trips
  • Pictures of classroom speakers
How do you make good community contact to resources?

How do you help students find appropriate resources?

What resources can your staff provide?

How do you access resources from your union?

How do you find and then vet good internet resources for teachers and students?

How do you effectively connect the student(s) with the resource?

What resources do you share with your peers?

Where, how, and when do you discuss resources with your peers?

1e. Designing coherent instruction

Teachers successfully meeting component 1e design classroom activities and lessons that consider:

  • Proper sequencing of learning activities
  • High cognitive value
  • Appropriate resources collected from reliable sources
  • Intentional grouping of students
  • The varied learning needs of students and options for students

1. Cognitive Engagement: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, it is essential that the educator consider ways to reach a high level of cognitive engagement within their lesson. This can be challenging to describe and identify. Students who are being well-engaged may be explaining their thinking, proving arguments, applying their knowledge in new ways.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Meeting Many Needs: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the many needs of students at different levels need to be met, and some lessons may be differentiated to provide more customized learning. Students need to be challenged at their own ability and developmental level, and able to move at their own pace when the lesson lends itself to it. On occasion, students will have a choice in what their assignment, assessment, or activity involves.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Lesson plans
  • Unit overview
  • Example of differentiated assignment
  • Example of student choices within assignments
What does cognitive engagement look like in your content, discipline, or classroom?

Where have you had students exercise authority or autonomy in this lesson?

What strategies do you use that allow your students to demonstrate what they are thinking?

How do you personalize the lesson to the student(s) in your class or their interests?

How does this lesson show student reasoning and evaluation of evidence?

How does your lesson allow students to evaluate their mistakes?

How much of the cognitive load for this lesson is on the students, and how much is on the teacher?

How do you group students to enhance the lesson?

1f. Designing student assessments

Teachers successfully meeting component 1f incorporate classroom assessments that:

  • Promote connections to the intended outcomes
  • Guide instructional practices
  • Allow for a variety of performance measures

1. Assessments are suitable to outcomes: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, assessments are diverse and offer students options to demonstrate competency in appropriate standards.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Formative Assessments are used to guide instruction: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, educators use a variety of assessments to inform and adjust their instruction.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Teacher or student developed rubrics
  • Formal and informal assessments
  • Student work products
How can I involve students in the assessment design process?

Are the assessments that I am using aligned with the outcomes that I planned?

How do I improve the quality of my formative assessments?

How do I help students be a participant in designing assessments?

How do I best explain the difference between formative and summative assessments to parents and students?

Are my assessments authentic and culturally relevant?

How do I collaborate with other educators to ensure that my assessments are highly effective?

How can I best use rubrics to improve student learning?

Domain 2: Classroom Environment

2a. Creating an environment of respect and rapport

Teachers successfully meeting component 2a design instructional outcomes that promote:

  • Students who feel safe and valued
  • Students who feel comfortable taking intellectual risks
  • Positive interactions among students
  • Caring interactions between teachers and students
  • Acknowledgment of students’ backgrounds and lives outside of the classroom

1. Managing Relationships: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers foster genuinely caring, highly civil relationships with and among all members of the class.

EX1: Student Special Questions

EX2:

2. Highly Positive Environment: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers create a highly positive environment where students feel valued and are comfortable taking intellectual risks.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Classroom procedures/rules
  • Number of students eating lunch in your classroom
  • Attending extracurricular activities
  • Sponsor club
  • Greeting students
  • Parent contact log highlighting positive interactions
How do I greet my students as they enter the classroom?

How do I address students being disrespectful to each other or to me?

Do I always model respectful behavior? How?

Do I make sure to positively reinforce positive, respectful behavior?

How do I ensure that students feel safe and valued in my classroom?

How do you create a classroom where students feel comfortable taking intellectual risks?

How do you challenge yourself to build a genuine rapport, even with difficult students?

Do students encourage positive interactions and respect in each other?

2b. Establishing a culture for learning

Teachers successfully meeting component 2b create classroom environments that consider:

  • Communicating high expectations for learning
  • Describing and demonstrating the positive culture of learning
  • The role the family plays in developing that culture
  • The role students play in supporting the learning environment
  • The precise use of content language by students and teachers
  • How students will actively engage in their learning

1. Classroom Culture: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the classroom culture must demand a shared belief in the importance of learning. To accomplish common goals, class time is maximized by both teachers and students. The culture is built on consistent routines and expectations that all support learning.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Conveying High Expectations: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, it is essential that the educator precisely convey their expectations. The teacher’s passion for the subject can be seen reflected in their students’ interest. The teacher insists that students work hard to demonstrate their best effort.

EX3:

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3. Student Responsibility: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, teachers should give students ownership to improve the learning environment and activities. Students trust the class to accept their input, suggestions, and corrections.

EX5:

EX6:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Rubrics
  • Lesson plans, “I Can” statements
  • Student created classroom rules and expectations
  • Student goals or portfolios
  • Classroom procedures for student responsibility
  • Evidence of class structures
  • Student reflections
What does ‘cognitively busy’ look like in your classroom?

What is considered ‘hard work’ in your classroom?

What classroom routines encourage high expectations, and how are they taught to students?

Do your students know that they should be doing?

Can your students teach routines or classroom expectations to new students?

How can students demonstrate responsibility in your classroom?

How can you observe a positive classroom culture in other classrooms?

In what way do students offer suggestions, corrections, or improvements in class?

2c. Managing classroom procedures

Teachers successfully meeting component 2c demonstrating the following procedures:

  • Smooth functioning of all routines
  • Little or no loss of instructional time
  • Students playing an important role in carrying out the routines
  • Students knowing what to do, where to move

1. Management of Instructional Groups: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, teachers are intentional in their grouping of students. The teacher uses a variety of classroom practices, activities, and setups that allow for individual work, partner work, or small group work as appropriate. Students are involved in the organization of groups, and they provide feedback on whether certain groupings are helpful or unhelpful.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Student Involvement in Classroom Routines: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, students are engaged in – and occasionally initiate – specific classroom routines. Some procedures are developed by students, and all students understand their role in daily routines. Students are also able and encouraged to teach these routines to new students.

EX3: Example

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Parent volunteer folder
  • Lunch and attendance graphs
  • Posters of expectations and/or procedures
  • Photos of table tubs
  • Pictures of area where missing work can be accessed
  • Video of class in transition
How do you manage instructional groups?

What are some of your strategies for smooth classroom transitions?

How do students know the procedures for transitions/management of materials/collecting late work, etc?

How do volunteers and paraprofessionals know the procedures and duties or their position?

How do you maximize the use of volunteers and paraprofessionals without interrupting the educational flow?

What are the student responsibilities in group work and how do they know?

How do you know when groups are working effectively?

How do you establish classroom routines and procedures?

2d. Managing student behavior

Teachers successfully meeting component 2d incorporate designing instructional outcomes that promote:

  • Orderly, productive, business-like environment
  • Clear expectations of conduct
  • Respect of and among students even when behavior is being corrected
  • Efficient management of classroom supplies and equipment
  • Student self-management

1. Classroom Environment: In order for students to deeply engage in content, the classroom environment must be orderly, the rules of conduct must be clear, the atmosphere must feel business-like and productive, without being authoritarian. Teacher’s corrective behavior is respectful, subtle, and preventative.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Active Student Role: In order for students to deeply engage in content, students take an active role in monitoring their own behavior. Students respectfully intervene with classmates at appropriate moments to ensure compliance with standards of conduct.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Classroom procedures/rules
  • Appropriate use of space
  • Observed student behavior
  • Clean, orderly classroom
Can students easily identify where materials are kept?

Is my classroom organizes in an efficient way?

How do you encourage students to manage their own behavior rather than relying on the teacher to do so?

Are classroom expectations clear for students? Posted in class?

How do I model and teach students kind ways to correct each other?

Is my classroom management reactive or preventative?

Are my responses to student misbehavior sensitive to individual student needs and respectful to their dignity?

How do you know if your students feel safe enough in the classroom to comment on each other’s behavior?

2e. Organizing physical space

Teachers successfully meeting component 2e organize classroom space to promote:

  • Safety
  • Accessibility
  • Effective and varied instruction
  • Use of technology
  • Mobility

1. Supportive Arrangement: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, the teacher will assure that the instructional space is safe, accessible, and promotes learning. Modifications are made to support a variety of lesson structures.

EX1:

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2. Students have the opportunity to modify the environment: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, students are encouraged to make adjustments to their environment.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Maps or photos of classroom layouts
  • Seating charts
  • Organization sources
  • Photos of organization
  • Safety checklist
  • Class rules that include permission to modify the environment
How does the classroom setup enhance instruction?

Does the equipment match the space?

Can every student see and hear the lesson?

Does the arrangement meet the needs of all students?

Has my room been checked for safety and who is responsible for doing so?

How do students learn what they are allowed to modify within the environment?

What instructional suggestions or modifications are you willing to hear from students?

When was the last time a student suggested a positive instructional change in the classroom? How was their suggestion treated?

Domain 3: Instruction

3a. Communicating with students

Teachers successfully meeting component 3a communicate effectively with students:

  • Clarity of lesson purpose
  • Clear directions and procedures specific to the lesson activities
  • Absence of content errors and clear explanations of concepts and strategies
  • Correct and imaginative use of language: analogies, metaphors, etc.
  • Scaffolding and connecting complex concepts with students’ lives
  • Providing opportunities for students to extend content

1. Make Connections Between the Lesson and the Larger Curriculum: Students can explain what they are learning and how that relates to the larger context of what they are learning in school. Teacher finds multiple ways to imaginatively and clearly explain topics. Teaching is organized to help scaffold learning at all levels.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Students Extend the Content: Students explain how the lessons are relevant in other content areas and to their own lives, and can teach this to their peers.

EX3:

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Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Student project
  • Exit ticket
  • Lesson plans
  • Video tape of students
  • Group projects
  • Word wall
Can students explain their learning to their peers using precise academic language?

What indicates that the teacher is using rich language?

How often are students asked to explain content to their peers?

Can students describe how content relates to their lives and other disciplines?

What scaffolding do you use to make complex concepts more accessible to all students?

How often do students suggest other strategies they might use when facing a challenge?

What ways does the teacher purposefully extend students’ vocabulary to bring content to life?

How often does a teacher use metaphors and analogies in their explanations?

3b. Using questioning and discussion techniques

Teachers successfully meeting component 3b incorporate classroom techniques that promote:

  • High level questioning
  • Whole group engaged in discussion
  • Varied response techniques
  • Student generated ideas and students extend the discourse
  • Deepening understanding

1. Questioning: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, questioning techniques need to include questions that meet the many different levels of cognitive engagement. In addition much of the questioning should come from the students as they seek and make new connections.

EX1: Dense Questions – (English, 9-12) Tim Parker, Fairbanks

EX2:

2. Discussion: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, class discussions – both whole group and small group – need to engage all students. The purpose of discussion is to help students find a deeper understanding of the content and should be driven significantly by the interaction of students, while the teacher acts as a facilitator.

EX3:

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3. Response Techniques: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers and students should respond to each other’s questions using a variety of strategies. These strategies should help students develop new ideas and challenge their thinking.

EX5:

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Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your questioning and discussion techniques throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Video
  • Question/discussion checklist
  • Lesson plan
  • Handouts for teaching questioning & discussion strategies
  • Discussion structure
  • Discussion rubric
How do you ensure that all students participate in class discussion?

What are you doing to improve the depth/level of your discussion?

How are students formulating questions and leading discussions?

How do you show that your class is improving their discussion and questioning skills?

How are your students making connections?

How does the school culture help support high-level learning discussions in class?

What is the balance of whole group and small group discussion in the class?

How do you anticipate and plan for student questions or misconceptions?

3c. Engaging students in learning

Teachers successfully meeting component 3c incorporate classroom techniques that promote:

  • Shared experiences that give a common background knowledge that allows students to move ahead together
  • Discussion, debate, answering “what if” questions, and discovering patterns
  • Student choice and decision-making regarding their learning opportunity
  • Cognitive challenge and student reflection
  • Differentiated learning
  • Students persist in their learning even when the task is challenging

1. Clearly Defined Structure: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, tasks are organized and paced with a clear beginning, middle and end, providing scaffolding so that students respond to what the teacher does by challenging themselves to go further.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Intellectual Engagement: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, students are provided with challenging content and tasks that require complex thinking. The students, through discussion, reflection, and participation, become self-motivated.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Science Lab
  • Video of class discussion
  • Student portfolio
  • Primary document analysis
  • Student created blog, web site, discussion board, collaborative document
  • Use of previous work in a new lesson
  • Self-selected student project
What does complex thinking look like?

How do today’s activities, and activities from previous lessons fit into what is about to happen?”

Did I provide opportunities for student initiative?

What resources are available to help me design more engaging lessons?

What can I do to reach the student that seems to lack self-motivation?

How do I find the balance between teaching mandated curriculum and allowing for student choice?

How can I engage students in pushing deeper thinking with their peers?

How do I know that students are getting enough to time to properly engage and reflect on the deeper learning?

3d. Using assessment in instruction

Successfully meeting component 3d will be demonstrated by the teacher:

  • Paying close attention to evidence of student understanding
  • Posing specifically created questions to elicit evidence of student understanding
  • Circulating to monitor student learning and to offer feedback
  • Encouraging students to assess their own work against established criteria

1. Student Know the Criteria for Assessment: Students have a clear understanding of high-quality work and contribute to the assessment criteria.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Monitoring of Student Learning: Teachers will use a variety of techniques to constantly assess student learning to guide instruction.

EX3:

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3. Feedback to Students: Valuable feedback may be timely, constructive, and substantive and must provide students the guidance they need to improve performance:

EX 5:

EX 6:

4. Student Self-Assessment and Monitoring of Progress: Students assume responsibility for their learning by self-assessing and monitoring their own progress and take appropriate action.

EX7:

EX8:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Student project rubrics
  • Exit ticket
  • Content portfolios
  • Summative and informative assessments
  • Student created rubrics
  • Strategies for student feedback
What is timely feedback?

How do you vary your assessment strategies?

How do the results of your assessments improve your teaching?

How do you train students to contribute to the evaluation criteria?

How do you train students to self-assess?

How do you ensure quality questioning?

How do your assessments provide for student choice?

What are the characteristics of high-quality work?

3e. Demonstrating flexibility and responsiveness

Teachers successfully meeting component 3e incorporate classroom techniques that promote:

  • Lesson adjustment
  • Response to students
  • Persistence

1. Incorporation of students’ interests and daily events into a lesson: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers should link lessons to students’ interests in meaningful ways.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Flexibility: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers will be able to recognize and incorporate teachable moments.

EX3:

EX4:

3. Response Techniques: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, educators need to build a repertoire of instructional strategies and utilize them to match the needs of the students.

EX5:

EX6:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Teacher reflection on how they incorporated students’ interests and daily events into a lesson
  • Sponge activities that provide for lesson adjustment
  • Teacher reflection on how they incorporated a teachable moment into a lesson
  • Joy file (items that renew and inspire a love of teaching)
  • Websites or resources that enhance lessons
  • Professional and community resources list
What is a teachable moment?

How much flexibility are you allowed?

Are my lessons so tight that there isn’t room for students’ interests and questions?

During the lesson, how do I monitor how well my students are understanding what is being taught?

How do I expand my repertoire of strategies to reach students?

Did I miss an opportunity to seize a teachable moment?

Did I collaborate with others in the building to completely enhance all of the techniques used in my lesson?

How do I keep going to make sure that every student has learned the key components of the lesson?

Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities

4a. Reflecting on teaching

Teachers successfully meeting component 4a incorporate reflection that:

  • Is done regularly as part of daily teaching practice.
  • Includes observations and specific examples.
  • Is used to improve future lessons by analyzing how a teacher’s planning decisions affect student learning.
  • Helps a teacher plan for and provide specific alternatives.

1. Reflection on Effectiveness of Instruction: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, the educator reflects on instruction with specificity and accuracy that is similar to an external observer.

EX1: Building Knowledge of Students

EX2:

2. Use in Future Instruction: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, the educator cites specific examples in their reflections that changed and improved their lessons.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Reflective journals or narratives
  • Student work samples
  • Notes from collegial and student conversations
How often do I make time for reflection?

How do I schedule time to ensure that I have the collegial conversations about teaching?

How do I improve the accuracy of my reflections?

In what ways do you get feedback from your students about your teaching?

How have your reflections on teaching changed your teaching practice?

Do students feel comfortable giving you feedback about your teaching?

Where do you keep track of specific teaching examples for future planning?

How often do you share your reflection process or results with colleagues? Is that something you could benefit from?

4b. Maintaining accurate records

Teachers successfully meeting component 4b keep accurate records of both instructional and non-instructional events:

  • Routines and systems that track student completion of assignments
  • Systems of information regarding student progress against instructional outcomes
  • Process of maintaining accurate non-instructional records
  • Students are involved in the record keeping process

1. Student Work: In order to reach higher levels of teaching, the teacher needs a systematic method for managing and monitoring student completion of work. This involves not just keeping track of which assignments are completed and what grades are earned, but also communicating this information back to students and families in a timely manner.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Student Progress in Learning: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, teachers must keep accurate data of formal and informal assessments in order to plan instruction. Students will be engaged in monitoring their own progress in learning as well as in the process of communicating with families.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Sticker charts
  • Portfolios
  • Behavior log
  • Check lists
  • Behavior log
  • Check lists
How does information about grades or assignments get delivered to families?

How are students involved in the keeping of records?

How do you know if students understand how they are being graded?

How often do you use clear rubrics in grading assignments or projects?

How often are grades updated for students and families?

How are the results of formative assessments communicated to students or parents?

Do you keep a record of student observations or anecdotes to help demonstrate their growth?

How do you record student behaviors or interactions?

4c. Communicating with families

Teachers successfully meeting component 4c communicate with families with these ideas in mind:

  • Establishing a caring and culturally appropriate relationship with families
  • Communicating the instructional program
  • Inviting families to be involved in the instructional program
  • The frequency of family communications
  • Students being involved in the record keeping and communication process

1. Inviting Families In: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, families need to be successfully invited to participate in the instructional program. This can include asking families to come to the school for events or extending lessons into the home.

EX1: Home Water Use – (Math/Science, 9-12) Chris Benshoof, Fairbanks

EX2:

2. Student Contributions: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, students need to contribute to maintaining records about their learning as well as in the communication process. This could include frequent student logs, students recording their academic progress, and students discussing class activities with their family.

EX3:

EX4:

3. Home Communication: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, communicating the instructional program with families should happen frequently. These communications should invite family participation and help maintain a culturally appropriate relationship.

EX5:

EX6:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your two-way communication with parents and families throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • School/classroom newsletter
  • Parent e-mails
  • Student culture survey
  • Student record keeping document
  • Student record keeping evidence
  • Communication log
  • School/class event invitations
How do families find out about what’s happening in your class?

What different cultures are represented in your classes?

How do you respond to the cultural differences in your classes?

How do students communicate their learning?

How often do you communicate with families?

How do you define frequent communication?

How have families engaged with classroom lessons?

How does two-way communication with families work in your classroom?

4d. Participating in a professional community

Teachers successfully meeting component 4d includes regular teacher participation:

  • With colleagues to share and plan for student success
  • In professional courses or communities that emphasize improving practice
  • In school initiatives
  • In and support of community initiatives

1. Relationships With Colleagues: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the teacher will maintain professional collegial relationships that encourage sharing, planning, and working together toward improved instructional skill and student success.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Involvement in a Culture of Professional Inquiry: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the teacher will take a leadership role in the school, district, and/or professional organization. Teachers seek out leadership roles that will improve and promote a culture of student success.

EX3:

EX4:

3. Participation in School and District Communities: In order to reach the higher levels of teaching, the teacher will contribute and work to improve the professional community. This may include leadership roles in school and district initiatives and projects.

EX5:

EX6:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Participation logs
  • PLC products
  • Proof of leadership in your professional organization
  • Professional reference of your leadership roles
  • Notes/agendas/minutes from PLC
How do you initiate leadership roles?

What are the qualities of a good teacher leader?

Do you initiate PLCs or collegial support?

How do you manage your time between the classroom and leadership roles?

How do your professional connections impact your classroom?

What school or district projects have you led?

What school or district projects do you wish to lead or participate in?

When was the last time you adapted a colleague’s lesson or idea for use in your own classroom?

4e. Growing and developing professionally

Teachers successfully meeting component 4e incorporate professional growth that promotes:

  • Increased pedagogical skill
  • Enhanced content knowledge
  • Professional contribution
  • Receiving and providing feedback

1. Actively seeking opportunities for professional development: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers have to remain current and active in their profession. Teachers may seek out additional courses or professional development beyond what is required for recertification. Teachers offer to lead professional development or share their expertise with colleagues.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Network with colleagues and professionals: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers actively pursue opportunities to lead and support within their profession. Teachers are members of professional networks at the local, state, or national level that focus on the teaching of their grade level or subject area. Teachers attend workshops or conferences when available to get new ideas. Teachers have a group of fellow teachers outside their school that they can talk to, share ideas with, and draw inspiration from. These connections impact the teacher’s classroom practice.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Membership in professional organizations
  • PLC notes
  • PLC book study
  • Course transcripts
  • Attendance at conferences
  • Action research data
How often do your colleagues observe your classroom?

How and when can you observe other classrooms?

What part of your instruction would you like to improve? How would simple action research improve that?

Are there professional development monies available, and how do you access them?

What professional organizations are specific to your discipline?

How can you share new knowledge that you have with your colleagues?

What is the most current professional literature you have read?

When was the last time you sought teaching advice or input from a teacher outside of your building?

4f. Showing professionalism

Teachers successfully meeting component 4f demonstrate their professionalism by:

  • Always being student focused
  • Advocating on behalf of all students and the profession as a whole
  • Acting with integrity, honesty, and dignity
  • Being an active participant in all aspects of the profession
  • Cooperatively seeking solutions

1. Student Focused: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers are highly proactive in meeting the educational needs of all students, especially those who are traditionally underserved.

EX1:

EX2:

2. Leadership Roles: In order to reach the highest levels of teaching, teachers participate in self-reflection, collaborate with other educators, and seek positive solutions. Professional teachers “give back” to the profession by assuming leadership roles, mentoring new teachers, and leading by example. Even the most experienced teachers continue to improve by seeking the advice and assistance of others.

EX3:

EX4:

Consider documenting your work in this component by collecting artifacts of your instructional sequences and planning throughout the year. This can help direct the conversation in your evaluation meeting, and help you share what you do with others. Possible artifacts for evaluation include:

  • Membership in professional organizations
  • Take leadership roles within school and community
  • Attends and/or testifies at School Board and other community meetings
  • Volunteer to teach “difficult” class and traditionally underserved students
  • Actively participate in department, curricular committees, and PLC’s
  • Sponsor a school student club or after school activity
  • Collaborate with other teachers
How can I ‘step-up’ my involvement in school?

How can I help fight negativity and engender a positive school culture?

Is my decision making always student-focused?

Do I conduct myself in a way that exemplifies the highest standards of professionalism?

Did I enlist help from a colleague when faced with a difficult situation?

Do I model the deportment I’d like to see from my students?

How do I handle trying situations – do I get caught up in complaining or do I make an effort to positively contribute to solutions?

Am I open to change and self-improvement?

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Alaska Teacher Contributors

Thank you to all the Alaskan educators who have contributed examples for this Evaluation Toolkit!

Chris Benshoof (Fairbanks) – 4c. Water Use at Home
Ivy Bowler (Anchorage) – 4a. Building Knowledge of Students
David Brighton (Kenai) – 2a. Student Special Questions
Jessica Cook (Anchorage – 2c.
Mark Fraad (Seward) – 1c. Levels and Standards in Elem. PE
Tim Parker (Fairbanks) – 3b. Dense Questions
Bob Williams (Palmer) – 1b. Student Perception Survey